Make your own free website on Tripod.com

Displayed with permission of Navsource

AT-105 / ATF-105 Moctobi


Awards, Citations and Campaign Ribbons





Precedence of awards is from top to bottom, left to right
Top Row - Navy Battle "E" Ribbon
Second Row - American Campaign Medal - Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal - World War II Victory Medal
Third Row - Navy Occupation Service Medal (with Asia clasp) - National Defense Service Medal - Korean Service Medal 2-stars)
Fourth Row - Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal (3 stars-Quemoy-Matsu, 4 stars-Vietnam) - Vietnam Service Medal (2 stars) - Coast Guard Unit Commendation
Fifth Row - United Nations Service Medal - Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal - Republic of Korea War Service Medal (retroactive)


Abnaki Class Fleet Ocean Tug
:
  • During the Korean War Moctobi (ATF-105) participated in the following campaigns:
    Korean War Campaigns
    Campaigns and Dates Campaigns and Dates
    Communist China Spring Offensive
    30 April to 20 May 1951
    1 to 18 June 1951
    UN Summer-Fall Offensive
    7 to 25 September 1951
    27 to 29 September 1951
    5 to 8 November 1951

  • During the Vietnam War Moctobi (ATF-105) participated in the following campaigns:
    Vietnam War Campaigns
    Campaigns and Dates Campaigns and Dates
    Vietnam Counteroffensive - Phase III
    13-JUL to 17 August 1967
    10 to 16 September 1967
    7 to 11 October 1967
    29 October to 4 November 1967
    Vietnam Counteroffensive - Phase VII
    31 August to 6 September 1970
    1 to 13 November 1970

  • Decommissioned, 30 September 1985, at Long Beach, CA.
  • Laid up in the Pacific Reserve Fleet, Bremerton, WA.
  • Struck from the Naval Register, 27 January 1992
  • Sold, 29 December 1997 to the Northeast Wisconsin Railroad Transportation Commission, to be leased to Escanaba and Lake Superior Railroad Co. Last known location (as of 1999) Port Richmond, CA.
  • Moctobi earned two battle stars for the Korean War and two campaign stars for the Vietnam War.
    Click On Image
    For Full Size Image
    Size Image Description Contributed
    By
    Moctobi 58k Moctobi (ATF-105) in World War II dark gray paint scheme circa April 1946
    US Navy photo
    Norman Davis via Mike Turner
    Moctobi 91k Moctobi (ATF-105) moored pierside at Adak, AK., spring 1962. Photo by Dennis Colton USS Moctobi
    Moctobi 99k Moctobi (ATF-105) bridge and wheelhouse area, 1962. Photo by Dennis Colton USS Moctobi
    Moctobi 91k Moctobi (ATF-105) fantail area. Note; tow in distance, 1962. Photo by Dennis Colton USS Moctobi
    Moctobi 109k Moctobi (ATF-105) with hazegray paint scheme circa June 1946 Norman Davis via Mike Turner
    Moctobi 42k Moctobi (ATF-105) at Alpha Dock, Naval Station Pearl Harbor, HI, 1966 Photo by Ralph Carpenter via Mike Turner
    Moctobi 33k Moctobi (ATF-105) undergoing salvage drills Photo by Joe Siesal, submitted
    to NAFTS
    (National Association
    of Fleet Tug Sailors)
    Moctobi 154k Moctobi (ATF-105) underway, circa late 1960s to early 1970s Steve Bingham via Mike Turner
    Moctobi 89k Moctobi (ATF-105) underway circa 1979-1982 Jim McLean via Mike Turner
    Moctobi 79k Moctobi (ATF-105) underway, date and place unknown.
    US Navy photo.
    Wendell Royce McLaughlin Jr
    Moctobi 75k Ex-Moctobi (ATF-105) and ex-Quapaw (ATF-110), Pier 9, former Naval Station Long Beach, CA., circa 1993 Photo by Art Ramirez USN Ret via Richard Tetrault
    Contributed by Mike Turner
    Moctobi 143k Ex-Moctobi (ATF 105) moored to port of the ex-Quapaw (ATF-110), date unknown, Sausalito, CA. Roger Herbst
    Quapaw 85k Ex-Moctobi (ATF 105) and ex-Quapaw (ATF-110) moored outboard and astern of the old wooden hulled West Coast passenger and freight steamer Wapama, date unknown, Sausalito, CA. Roger Herbst

    This Website wishes to acknowlege and thank Nav Source in allowing us to utilize these pictures for this website. GO NAVY.


    Mactobi
    An American Indian tribe of Arizona.

    Specifications:
    Displacement 1,240 t.(lt) 1,589 t.(fl)
    Length 205'
    Beam 38' 6"
    Draft 15' 4"
    Speed 16.5 kts.
    Complement 85
    Armament

    one single 3"/50 DP gun mount
    two twin 40mm AA gun mounts
    two single 20mm AA gun mounts
    Propulsion diesel-electric, four Alco diesel main engines driving four General Electric generators and three General Motors 3-268A auxiliary services engines, single screw
    Moctobi (ATF‑105) was laid down as AT‑105 by Charleston Shipbuilding
    & Drydock Co., Charleston, S.C., 7 October 1943; launched 25 March 1944;
    sponsored by Mrs. Wade C. Harrison; reclassified ATF‑105 on 15 May 1944;
    and commissioned at Charleston 25 July 1944, Lt. Troy Braesher in command.

    After shakedown in Chesapeake Bay, Moctobi wasassigned to duty in the Pacific
    with ComServPac. Departing Norfolk 1 September, she stopped at New Orleans
    where she took in tow a section of ABSD‑3; thence, she sailed
    for the Marshalls 8 September. She reached Eniwetok via Majuro 21 November
    and steamed to Hawaii, arriving Pearl Harbor the 29th. On 12 December
    she sailed in convoy to Eniwetok with another ABSD section.
    After touching at Eniwetok the 29th, she departed 2 January 1945 for Guam.
    She dropped off ABD‑16 at Guam 9 January; sailed for Ulithi the same day;
    and reached that important advance base two days later.

    Assigned to Service Squadron 10, Moctobi operated out of Ulithi until the end
    of the war in the Pacific. There she carried out the harbor duties necessary
    to prepare ships of the hard‑hitting task forces for their strikes against
    the enemy. During the Iwo Jima campaign she served on a standby basis
    with the Support Force and at the conclusion of the campaign
    towed Marl (IX‑160) from Saipan to Ulithi.

    On 30 March 1945 Moctobi sailed with units of the fast tanker fleet
    and joined the Logistic Support Group off Okinawa. During the next 47 days
    she provided at sea logistics support for ships of the 5th Fleet,
    thence returned to Ulithi 12 to 16 May. After completing a run to Leyte Gulf
    and back, she departed Ulithi 3 July with other ATFs and joined the
    Logistics Support Group for support of the 3d Fleet Bombardment Force.
    She served at sea during the closing weeks of the war and arrived Yokosuka, Japan,
    after the cessation of hostilities. She began supporting occupation operations
    29 August and aided in the landing of initial occupation forces in the Tokyo area.
    She towed American and Japanese ships and supported demolition operations
    of Jap suicide boats and submarines along the eastern coast of Honshu.

    Moctobi sailed for Okinawa 14 October and for more than 2 months aided in
    salvaging and refloating many ships damaged by the recent vicious typhoons.
    On Christmas Eve she sailed for Pearl Harbor with ARD‑29 in tow.
    Upon arriving, she reported to ComServPac for continued duty out of Pearl Harbor.
    She returned to the west coast in May 1946 and later that year deployed
    once again to the Far East. She operated in the Philippines until June 1947,
    thence sailed to the United States. She began preinactivation overhaul at
    San Francisco 1 December and decommissioned 30 June 1948.
    Assigned to the Pacific Reserve Fleet 27 August, she was berthed at Alameda, Calif.

    On 8 November 1950 Moctobi recommissioned at San Francisco, Lt. John M. Geortner
    in command. Following refresher training off the west coast, Moctobi steamed
    to the Far East. Between February and November 1951 she was underway
    almost constantly, touching Midway, Eniwetok, Kwajalein, Guam, Subic Bay, Sasebo,
    Yokosuka. Inchon, Pusan, Okinawa, Taiwan, and Taechong Do, Korea.
    In September she conducted salvage operations on the ROK PF‑62 off Abru Somu
    Island, North Korea. She towed the damaged ship to Pusan thence to Yokosuka
    for repairs. She returned to Pearl Harbor in December for overhaul,
    thence between April and September 1952 made several towing trips to
    Johnson Island and the Marshalls.

    In November Moctobi steamed to the northern Pacific for duty in the Aleutians.
    During the next several months she carried out towing and SAR duty from Dutch Harbor
    to Attu. She returned to Pearl Harbor in June 1953. Following operations between
    Hawaii and the west coast, she made another WestPac deployment in March 1954.
    Tug and towing assignments sent her from Japan to the Philippines and from Korea
    to French Indochina. In September she steamed via Pearl Harbor to San Francisco,
    and during the next year she carried out tows along the west coast
    and to Pearl Harbor.

    Moctobi maintained a busy tug and towing schedule throughout the Pacific
    for more than a decade. Although homeported in Pearl Harbor, she ranged the Pacific
    from the west coast to the Far East while supporting the might of American seapower
    in the Pacific. She carried out towing duties to American bases throughout
    the Pacific and when requested she provided emergency at sea tows for ships in distress.
    In addition she carried out SAR patrols and undertook special operations
    of a classified nature for the Atomic Energy Commission.

    Following a 3‑month deployment to the Aleutians in mid‑1963,
    Moctobi steamed to Seattle, Wash., 15 October to prepare for an unusual towing
    assignment. On 28 October she departed for Honolulu, Hawaii, with the four-masted
    sailing ship Falls of Clyde (see DANFS, vol. 111, p. 733) in tow. During the trip,
    which took 21 days, Moctobi encountered several severe storms with 40‑
    not winds and 20‑foot seas. However, she delivered the
    wroughtiron‑hulled ship, safely to tugs off Honolulu 21 November.

    Since 1963 Moctobi has continued to carry out tug and towing assignments,
    as well as additional duties given to this busy ATF, with skill and dispatch.
    Whether operating in the waters of the north Pacific or in the Far East, she has
    supported the mighty ships of the U.S. Navy in the continuing struggle to maintain
    the freedom of the seas for the forces of freedom. Into 1969 she continues to range
    the length and breadth of the Pacific while operating out of Pearl Harbor.


    Falls of Clyde
    The Falls of Clyde is the only surviving iron-hulled, four-masted sailing ship,
    and the only surviving sail-driven oil-tanker, in the world.
    She is presently a museum ship in Honolulu, Hawaii.

    She was built in 1878 by Russell and Company in Port Glasgow, Scotland,
    launched as the first of six iron-hulled four-masted ships built for Wright
    and Breakenridge's "Falls Line." She was named after the Falls of Clyde,
    a waterfall up the River Clyde. She was built to the highest standard -
    Lloyd's Register A-1 - for general worldwide trade. Her maiden voyage took her
    to Karachi, and her first six years were spent engaged in the India trade.
    She then became a tramp pursuing general cargo such as lumber, jute, cement,
    and wheat from ports in Australia, California, India, New Zealand,
    and the British Isles.

    After twenty-one years under the Union Jack, Falls of Clyde was purchased
    for US$25,000 by Captain William Matson of the Matson Navigation Company,
    taken to Honolulu, Hawaii in 1899, and registered under the Hawaiian flag.
    When the Republic of Hawaii was annexed by the United States in 1900,
    it took a special act of the United States Congress to secure the foreign-built
    ship the right to fly the Stars and Stripes.

    To economize on crew, Matson rigged Falls of Clyde down as a barque,
    replacing the five yards on her aft mast with two easier-managed fore-and-aft sails.
    At the same time, he added a deckhouse, charthouse, and rearranged
    the after quarters to accommodate paying passengers.
    From 1899 to 1907, she made over sixty voyages between Hilo, Hawaii,
    and San Francisco, California. She carried general merchandise from San Francisco
    and sugar from Hawaii, and passengers both ways. She developed a reputation
    as a handy, fast, and commodious vessel; her voyages averaged 17 days each way.

    In 1907, the Associated Oil Company (which later became Tidewater Oil) bought
    Falls of Clyde and converted her to a bulk tanker with a capacity of 19,000 barrels
    (three million liters, 800,000 gallons). In this configuration she sailed
    from Gaviota, California, with kerosene, which she discharged in Honolulu
    at the Oahu Railway and Land Company's Pier 16. On her return voyages,
    she carried bulk molasses to California, where it was used for cattle feed.

    In 1927, the bark was sold to the General Petroleum Company,
    her masts were cut down, and she served as a floating fuel depot
    in Alaska until 1959. She was sold to William Mitchell, who towed her to Seattle,
    Washington, intending to sell her to a preservation group. Mitchell's plan fell
    through and subsequent efforts by Karl Kortum, director of the San Francisco
    Maritime Museum, and Fred Klebingat, who had sailed in her as chief mate in 1915,
    to place her in Long Beach, California, or Los Angeles, California, were similarly
    disappointed.

    In 1963, the bank holding the mortgage on Falls of Clyde decided to sell her
    to be sunk as part of a breakwater at Vancouver, British Columbia.
    Kortum and Klebingat aroused interest in the ship in Hawaii, and within days of the
    scheduled scuttling, raised funds to buy the ship. At the end of October 1963,
    Falls of Clyde was taken under tow by fleet tug USS Moctobi.
    In honor of their historic tow, the crew of the tug kept their logs in verse,
    the first entry reading:

    As we sail across the Set
    The Falls of Clyde keeps us company
    Moctobi's engines grit and grind
    To keep old Clyde close behind.
    On 18 November, they arrived in Honolulu, recording

    Today, hauling cargo to Hawaii was seen a proud white ship.
    We couldn't help remembering Clyde and all her similar trips.
    Yes this one is quite differenct than those of earlier times,
    When she carried black oil and molasses to many different climes
    Today the cargo is memories and sea stories yet untold
    Which when moored tomorrow may be brought up from the hold.
    Tomorrow at Honolulu her final trip will end,
    And we will bid aloha to our gallant seagoing friend.
    The crew was concerned about the reaction these verses might receive from Commander,
    Service Force, Pacific Fleet. Upon their arrival at Honolulu they received a message
    reading:

    Your towing debut is finally Pau
    The Clyde's at home forever now.
    Your sitreps were noted with interest each day
    As Moctobi pulled the long, rough way.
    This grand old lady is destined to be
    A memorable relic for all Hawaii
    By your fine effort the task is won.
    Welcome home, and to all a well done.
    -- VADM Roy Johnson, Deputy, CINCPACFLT
    In May 1964, on behalf of his crew, the commanding officer of Moctobi,
    Lieutenant Leo Connolly, accepted the Distinguished Service Award
    for Community Relations from the Chamber of Commerce of Honolulu.

    Falls of Clyde was given to the Bernice P. Bishop Museum.
    She opened to the public in 1968. Her restoration as a full-rigged ship
    was assisted by the grandson of the original builder, Sir William Lithgow,
    whose Glasgow shipyard donated masts and other fittings. In 1973 she was
    entered into the National Register of Historic Places. In mid-2004,
    Falls of Clyde is still located at Pier 7, Honolulu Harbor,
    part of the Hawaii Maritime Center.


       
    Ships of Joint Task Force (JTF) 7.3 - Operation Hardtack 1
    NAME
    PERIOD IN EPG
    REMARKS
    USS BOXER (CVS-21)
    FEB 58-AUG 58
    FLAGSHIP
    USS COMSTOCK (LSD-19)
    DEC 57-APR 58
    USS TORTUGA (LSD-26)
    FEB 58-APR 58
    USS BELLE GROVE (LSD-2)
    APR 58-AUG 58
    USS MONTICELLO (LSD-35)
    APR 58-AUG 58
    T-LST 618
    SEP 47-DEC 58
    T-LST 664
    SEP 57-OCT 58
    USS RENVILLE (APA-227)
    APR 58-MAY 58
    USS MAGOFFIN (APA-1990
    MAY 58-JUN 58
    USS NAVARRO (APA-215)
    JUL 58-AUG 58
    USS FLOYD B. PARKS (DD-884)
    MAR 58-MAY 58
    USS JOHN R. CRAIG (DD-885)
    MAR 58-MAY 58
    USS ORLECK (DD-886)
    MAR 58-MAY 58
    USS PERKINS (DDR-877)
    MAR 58-MAY 58
    USS MANSFIELD (DD-728)
    MAY 58-AUG 58
    USS COLLETT (DD-730)
    MAY 58-AUG 58
    USS DEHAVEN (DD-727)
    MAY 58-AUG 58
    USS BENNER (DDR-807)
    MAY 58-AUG 58
    USS EPPERSON (DDE-719)
    AUG 58-AUG 58
    USS CHANTICLEER (ASR-7)
    APR 58-MAY 58
    USS GRASP (ARS-24)
    MAR 58-JUN 58
    USS BOLSTER (ARS-38)
    MAR 58-JUN 58
    USS MOCTOBI (ATF-105)
    FEB 58-JUN 58
    USS ARIKARA (ATF-98)
    MAR 58-AUG 58
    USS TAKELMA (ATF-113)
    MAR 58-AUG 58
    USS MUNSEE (ATF-107)
    MAR 58-JUN 58
    USS CHOWANOC (ATF-100)
    MAR 58-JUN 58
    USS CREE (ATF-84)
    APR 58-AUG 58
    USS HOOPER ISLAND (ARG-17)
    APR 58-JUN 58
    USS CACAPON (AO-52)
    MAR 58-AUG 58
    USS LANSING (DER-388)
    MAY 58-JUN 58
    USS JOYCE (DER-317)
    MAY 58-JUN 58
    USS SILVERSTEIN (DE-534)
    SEP 58-SEP 58
    3 Weeks period.
    USS REHOBOTH (AGS-50)
    APR 58-JUN 58
    USS LAWRENCE CTY (LST-887)
    MAY 58-JUN 58
    USS AINSWORTH (T-AP-181)
    APR 58-JUL 58
    USS BONITA (SSK-3)
    APR 58-JUN 58
    USS KARIN (AF-33)
    MAR 58-AUG 58
    Operated bwtween Pearl
    USS MERAPI (AF-38)
    MAR 58-AUG 58
    Harbor and EPG.
    USS COGSWELL (DD-651)
    JUL 58-AUG 58
    USS SAFEGUARD (ARS-25)
    JUL 58-AUG 58
    USS HITCHITI (ATF-103)
    JUL 58-AUG 58
    Mission Basis.
    USS TILLAMAMOOK (ATF-102)
    JUL 58-AUG 58
    Source:
    Title: OPERATION HARDTACK ENIWETOK PROVING GROUND MARCH-AUGUST 1958
    FINAL REPORT COMMANDER TASK GROUP 7.3 (DELETED)
    Originating Organization: JOINT TASK FORCE SEVEN
    Location of Document: DOE/NV Coordination and Information Center
    P.O. Box 98521
    Las Vegas, NV 89193-8521
    Phone:(702)295-1628
    Fax: (702)295-0877
    EMail: cic@nv.doe.gov
    Document Number: DASA-A-61-521; DASAA61521
    Document Type: Report
    Document Date: 11/03/1958
    Declassification Status: SANITIZED DOCUMENT AVAILABLE
    Document Pages: 0272
    Accession Number: NV0116875
    Opennet Entry Date: 02/17/1995

    Allied Ships Present in Tokyo Bay During the Surrender Ceremony, 2 September 1945

    The ships in the list below are listed alphabetically within each type.
    US Navy ships have hull numbers and Allied ships have pendant numbers.
    The following abbreviations are used for military ships: HMS=British,
    HMAS=Australian, HMNZS=New Zealand, USS=American.

    Source: Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet and Pacific Ocean Areas
    (CINCPAC/CINCPOA) A16-3/FF12 Serial 0395, 11 February 1946:
    Report of Surrender and Occupation of Japan.
    Battleships (BB)
    USS Colorado (BB-45)
    USS Mississippi (BB-41)
    HMS Duke of York (17)
    USS Missouri (BB-63)
    USS Idaho (BB-42)
    USS New Mexico (BB-40)
    USS Iowa (BB-61)
    USS South Dakota (BB-57)
    HMS King George V (41)
    USS West Virginia (BB-48)

    Small Aircraft Carriers (CVL)
    USS Bataan (CVL-29)
    USS Cowpens (CVL-25)

    Escort Carriers (CVE)
    HMS Ruler (D.72)
    HMS Speaker (D.90)
    Salamaua

    Heavy Cruisers (CA)
    USS Boston (CA-69)
    USS St. Paul (CA-73)
    USS Chicago (CA-136)
    HMAS Shropshire (96)
    USS Quincy (CA-71)

    Light Cruisers (CL)
    USS Detroit (CL-8)
    USS Pasadena (CL-65)
    HMNZS Gambia (48)
    USS San Diego (CL-53)
    HMAS Hobart (I.63)
    USS San Juan (CL-54)
    HMS Newfoundland (59)
    USS Springfield (CL-66)
    USS Oakland (CL-95)
    USS Wilkes-Barre (CL-103)

    Destroyers (DD)
    USS Ault (DD-698)
    USS Mayo (DD-422)
    USS Benham (DD-796)
    HMAS Napier (G.97)
    USS Blue (DD-744)
    HMAS Nizam (G.38)
    USS Buchanon (DD-484)
    USS Nicholas (DD-449)
    USS Caperton (DD-650)
    USS Perkins (DD-877)
    USS Charles F. Hughes (DD-428)
    HMS Quality (G.62)
    USS Clarence K. Bronson (DD-668)
    USS Robert K. Huntington (DD-781)
    USS Cogswell (DD-651)
    USS Southerland (DD-743)
    USS Colahan (DD-658)
    USS Stockham (DD-683)
    USS Cotten (DD-669)
    USS Taylor (DD-468)
    USS Cushing (DD-797)
    HMS Teazer (R.23)
    USS De Haven (DD-727)
    HMS Tenacious (R.45)
    USS Dortch (DD-670)
    HMS Terpsichore (R.33)
    USS Frank Knox (DD-742)
    USS Twining (DD-540)
    USS Gatling (DD-671)
    USS Uhlmann (DD-687)
    USS Halsey Powell (DD-686)
    USS Wadleigh (DD-689)
    USS Healy (DD-672)
    HMS Wager (R.98)
    USS Hilary P. Jones (DD-427)
    USS Wallace L. Lind (DD-703)
    USS Ingersoll (DD-652)
    HMAS Warramunga (I.44)
    USS Kalk (DD-611)
    USS Wedderburn (DD-684)
    USS Knapp (DD-653)
    HMS Whelp (R.37)
    USS Lansdowne (DD-468)
    HMS Wizard (R.72)
    USS Lardner (DD-487)
    USS Wren (DD-568)
    USS Madison (DD-425)
    USS Yarnell (DD-541)

    Destroyer Escorts (DE)
    USS Goss (DE-444)
    USS Ulvert M. Moore (DE-442)
    USS Kendall C. Campbell (DE-443)
    USS Waterman (DE-740)
    USS Lyman (DE-302)
    USS Weaver (DE-741)
    USS Major (DE-796)
    USS William Seiverling (DE-441)
    USS Roberts (DE-749)

    Frigates
    HMS Derg (K.257)
    HMAS Gascoyne (K.354)
    HMS Woodcock (U-90)

    Sloops
    HMS Crane (U.23)
    HMS Whimbrel (U.29)

    Light Mine layer (DM)
    USS Gwin (DM-33)
    USS Thomas E. Fraser (DM-24)

    Mine Sweeper, High Speed (DMS)
    USS Ellyson (DMS-19)
    USS Hopkins (DMS-13)
    USS Fitch (DMS-25)
    USS Jeffers (DMS-27)
    USS Gherardi (DMS-30)
    USS Macomb (DMS-23)
    USS Hambleton (DMS-20)

    Submarines (SS)
    USS Archerfish (SS-311)
    USS Pilotfish (SS-386)
    USS Cavalla (SS-244)
    USS Razorback (SS-394)
    USS Gato (SS-212)
    USS Runner (SS-476)
    USS Haddo (SS-255)
    USS Sea Cat (SS-399)
    USS Hake (SS-256)
    USS Segundo (SS-398)
    USS Muskallunge (SS-262)
    USS Tigrone (SS-419)

    Submarine Chasers (PC)
    *Numbered ships given names in 1956.
    PC-466 [USS Carmil]*
    PCE(R)-849 [USS Somersworth]*
    PCE-877 [USS Havre]*
    PCE(R)-850 [USS Fairview]*
    PCE(R)-848

    Motor Gunboat (PGM)
    PGM-16
    PGM-32
    PGM-26

    Minesweeper (AM)
    HMAS Ballarat (K.34)
    USS Pochard (AM-375)
    HMAS Cessnock (J.175)
    USS Revenge (AM-110)
    HMAS Ipswich (J.186)
    USS Token (AM-126)
    USS Pheasant (AM-61)
    USS Tumult (AM-127)
    HMAS Pirie (J.189)

    Motor Mine Sweeper (YMS)
    *Numbered ships named and reclassified in 1947
    YMS-177
    YMS-390
    YMS-268
    YMS-415
    YMS-276
    YMS-426
    YMS-343
    YMS-441 [USS Pelican (AMS-32)]*
    YMS-362 [USS Hawk (AMS-17)]*
    YMS-461 [USS Swallow (AMS-36)]*
    YMS-371 [USS Hornbill (AMS-19)]* YMS-467

    Auxiliary Mine Layer (ACM)
    USS Picket (ACM-8)

    Amphibious Force Flagship (AGC)
    USS Ancon (AGC-4)
    USS Teton (AGC-14)
    USS Mount Olympus (AGC-8)

    High Speed Transport (APD)
    USS Barr (APD-39)
    USS Pavlic (APD-70)
    USS Burke (APD-65)
    USS Reeves (APD-52)
    USS Gosselin APD-126)
    USS Runels (APD-85)
    USS Hollis APD-86)
    USS Sims (APD-50)
    USS Horace A. Bass APD-124)
    USS Wantuck (APD-125)
    USS John Q. Roberts(APD-94)
    USS William M. Pattison (APD-104)

    Tank Landing Ship (LST)
    *Numbered ships named in 1955.
    LST-567
    LST-789
    LST-648
    LST-846 [USS Jennings County]*
    LST-717
    LST-1083 [USS Plumas County]*
    LST-718
    LST-1139

    Landing Ship, Dock (LSD)
    USS Catamount (LSD-17)
    USS Shadwell (LSD-15)

    Landing Craft, Infantry (LCI)
    LCI(L)-438
    LCI(L)-469
    LCI(L)-441
    LCI(L)-726
    LCI(L)-450
    LCI(L)-752
    LCI(L)-457
    LCI(L)-798
    LCI(L)-458

    Medium Landing Ship (LSM)
    LSM-13
    LSM-290
    LSM-15
    LSM-362
    LSM-71
    LSM-368
    LSM-101
    LSM-371
    LSM-208
    LSM-419
    LSM-252
    LSM-488 LSM-284
    Landing Ship, Vehicle (LSV)
    USS Monitor (LSV-5)
    USS Ozark (LSV-2)

    Attack Transport (APA)
    USS Bosque (APA-135)
    USS Highlands (APA-119)
    USS Botetourt (APA-136)
    USS Lavaca (APA 180)
    USS Briscoe (APA-65)
    ) USS Lenawee (APA-195)
    USS Cecil (APA-96)
    USS Mellette (APA-156)
    USS Clearfield (APA-142)
    USS Missoula (APA-211)
    USS Cullman (APA-78)
    USS Rutland (APA-192)
    USS Darke (APA-159)
    USS St. Mary's (APA-126)
    USS Dauphin (APA-97
    USS Sherburne (APA-205)
    USS Deuel (APA-160)
    USS Sheridan (APA-51)
    USS Dickens (APA-161)
    USS Talladega (APA-208)

    USS Hansford (APA-106
    Transport (AP)
    USS General Sturgis (AP-137)

    Attack Cargo Ship (AKA)
    USS Libra (AKA-12)
    USS Todd (AKA-71)
    USS Medea (AKA-31)
    USS Tolland (AKA-64)
    USS Pamina (AKA-34)
    USS Whiteside (AKA-90)
    USS Sirona (AKA-43)
    USS Yancy (AKA-93)

    USS Skagit (AKA-105)
    Cargo Ship (AK)
    USS Lesuth (AK-125)

    Civilian Cargo Ships
    St. Lawrence Victory (US)
    Winthrop Victory (US)

    Stores Issue Ship (AKS)
    USS Cybele (AKS-10)

    Repair Ship (AR)
    USS Delta (AR-9)

    Landing Craft Repair Ship (ARL)
    USS Patroclus (ARL-19)

    Oiler (AO)
    USS Chiwawa (AO-68)
    USS Niobrara (AO-72)
    USS Mascoma (AO-83)
    USS Tamalpais (AO-96)

    USS Neches (AO-47)
    Civilian Oilers
    Carelia (British)
    Fort Wrangell (British
    City of Dieppe (British)
    Wave King (British)
    Dingledale (British)

    Gasoline Tanker (AOG)
    USS Genesee (AOG-8)

    Destroyer Tender (AD)
    USS Piedmont (AD-17)

    Hospital Ship (AH)
    USS Benevolence (AH-13)
    HMHS Tjitjalengka (Dutch)
    Marigold (U.S. Army)

    Seaplane Tender (AV)
    USS Cumberland Sound (AV-17)
    USS Hamlin (AV-15)

    Small Seaplane Tender (AVP)
    USS Gardiners Bay (AVP-39)
    USS Suisun (AVP-53)
    USS Mackinac (AVP-13)

    Submarine Tender (AS)
    USS Proteus (AS-19)

    Submarine Rescue Ship (ASR)
    USS Greenlet (ASR-10)

    Fleet Ocean Tug (ATF)
    USS Moctobi (ATF-105)
    USS Wenatchee (ATF-118)

    Auxiliary Ocean Tug (ATA)
    *Numbered ship named in 1955
    ATA-205 [USS Sciota]*


    NOTE: #USS Hughes was listed in the report, but according to the ship's deck log
    was crossing the international date line enroute to Japan.
    USS Charles F. Hughes was sweeping mines. At 10:27 the ship passed Ashika Light.
    At 10:30 the war ended. At 10:44 the ship made preparations for entering the port
    and anchored at 12:21 in Tokyo Bay.

    #USS Woodcock (ATO-145) is listed in the report, but that ship spent World War II
    in Central and South American waters. The ship named Woodcock that was present
    was HMS Woodcock, a frigate.


    List of Ships at Operation Wigwam, 1955
    Total personnel 6,758 including civilians
    In 1955, the U.S. Navy fired an underwater atomic weapon to study the effects on
    submarine hulls. This time instead of Bikini or Eniwetok, they sailed southwest
    of San Diego for Operation Wigwam.
    SHIP NAME
    USS COMSTOCK (LSD-19)
    USS FT MARION (LSD-22)
    USS MARION COUNTY (LST-975)
    USS MORGAN COUNTY (LST-1048)
    USS CREE (ATF-84)
    USS MOCTOBI (ATF-105)
    USS EITCHITI (ATF-103)
    USS TAWASA (ATF-92)
    USS RECLAIMER (ARS-42)
    USS BOLSTER (ARS-38)
    USS CHANTICLEER (ARS-7)
    USS BUTTERNUT (AN-9)
    USS MT MCKINLEY (AGC-7)
    USS CURTISS (AV-4)
    USS GEORGE EASTMAN (YAG-39)
    USS GRANVILLE S. HALL (YAG-40)
    USS MOLALA (ATF-106)
    USS WRIGHT (CVL-49)
    USS BLUE (DD-744)
    USS ALFRED A. CUNNINGHAM (DD-752)
    USS FRANK E. EVANS (DDR-754)
    USS MCKEAN (DDR-784)
    USS WALKE (DD-723)
    USS O'BRIEN (DD-725)
    USS HARRY E. HUBBARD (DD-748)
    USS ERNEST G. SMALL (DDR-838)

    Crew Search:
    Miltary.com
    Additional Resources and Web Sites of Interest
    National Association of Fleet Tug Sailors
    E-MAIL WEBMASTER

    Quapaw / Moctobi Website